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It’s easy to assemble a compilation that documents a musical movement or scene after the fact. Not to dismiss Rhino’s many impressive box sets, but all you need are dedicated and opinionated researchers and a passel of lawyers to negotiate the rights. But capturing a scene as it emerges is like catching lightning in a bottle. NME did it so well with C86 that the movement eventually took its name from the legendary 1986 compilation. The deluxe reissue brings the original 22 tracks to CD fleshed out with two more discs of tracks by like-minded bands.

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CBGB is rightly famous in the annuls of punk, but No Slam Dancing, No Stage Diving, No Spikes: An Oral History of the Legendary City Gardens by Amy Yates Wuelfing and Steven DiLodovico (Morrisville, PA: DiWulf, 2014) recalls a less-storied venue, one where “legendary” is a debatable description.

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The Girls in the Band | Education Project and Platform

I have been watching “The Girls in the Band” project for quite a while now and I am beyond excited that it is finally available for purchase. I am especially pleased that the purchase includes “use of all materials for classrooms, as well as the rights to screen the film for the life of the DVD on your campus or library grounds,” as long as you don’t charge a viewing fee. They must know a librarian!

From the Website: Now Available to Universities, Libraries, and High Schools A New York Times Critics’ Pick!  The award-winning documentary film THE GIRLS IN THE BAND tells the poignant, untold stories of female jazz and big band instrumentalists and their fascinating, history-making journeys from the late 30s to the present day. The many first-hand accounts of the challenges faced by these talented women provide a glimpse into decades of racism and sexism that have existed in America.

Contributor: Stephanie Lewin-Lane

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It’s Album Time by Norwegian DJ / electronic artist Todd Terje is deliciously weird.

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Michael Jackson's 'Xscape': Track-By-Track Review

Michael Jackson's 'Xscape': Track-By-Track Review
To answer your first question: Yes, it is any good. And about your second: Better than you think. 
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Blending electronics, tape loops, and piano, Sontag Shogun’s full length debut, "Tale" (Palaver Press PM007), is a bittersweet soundscape filled with longing and nostalgia. Essentially a partial reformation of post-rock sextet (The) Slowest Runner (In All the World), this Brooklyn trio’s tuneful approach to ambient music brings an emotive potency to the otherwise cerebral practice of sound collage.

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Independent Lens has been showing the film Muscle Shoals on local PBS affiliates lately. I stumbled upon the film by accident a few weeks ago, and haven’t gotten it out of my head since.

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Accomplished musicians in their own right, Wilco’s Nels Cline (guitar) and Glenn Kotche (drums) each have new albums.

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On the free jazz trio The Nels Cline Singers’ aptly titled Macroscope (Mack Avenue 1085), Cline executes a visceral, smearing hodgepodge of guitar artistry, ranging from impressionistic lounge jazz to driving post-rock and face melting noise. He channels an array of jazz guitar greats from John Abercrombie to John McLaughlin, and even a smattering of George Benson. For fans of Wilco who are open to something new, and for patrons looking for virtuosic performance and bold eclecticism within the familiar frameworks of jazz and rock, Macroscope will be a real treat.

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Interested in Rockabilly Music, but don’t know where to start? Here is a basic playlist to introduce you to the genre. This list is not comprehensive by any means, but it is a nice overview of original, old-school rockabilly from the 50s & 60s. There will be more sub-genre playlists to come, including influences, so stay tuned!

Elvis Presley- “Baby Let’s Play House”

Wanda Jackson- “Rock Your Baby”

- “Rocket 88”

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Welcome to the Music Library Association Jazz and Popular Music Roundtable blog. Our purpose is to share reviews of new releases we’re excited about among ourselves and with other music librarians and the broader library and music audience. The point is to get past the obvious selections (You do already have the Frozen soundtrack in your library collection, don’t you?) and get to the things that are a bit below the radar.
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I’m breaking the ice with Gary Numan’s latest Splinter: Songs from a Broken Mind (Mortal MHMC15).

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